Saturday, September 30, 2017

Study hard, and then take a break.

Getting lots of practice is important, but you cannot study non-stop. Learn to pace yourself!


Study hard, and then take a break.

Three Simple Frameworks for Feedback

Be sure to read the great article that explains these three strategies in detail: Three Simple Frameworks for Feedback by Melanie Kong.



Plus (+) / Delta (Δ). Pluses are positive things to keep or repeat, while deltas are changes to make in the future.


I like…, I wish…, What if… Starting your likes and wishes with the word “I…” helps frame your feedback as personal observations and opinions, which in turn makes the feedback easier to accept by the feedback recipient.


Strengths, Weaknesses, Questions, Ideas (SWQI). Organize your feedback into these four quadrants: Strengths, Weaknesses, Questions, and Ideas.

Sunday, September 24, 2017

I want to know more!

Today's cat is inspired by a blog post by one of the students in my classes (see more quotes):

Sometimes I limit myself to only what I know, when there is so much more in the world. I want to know more!



Sunday, September 17, 2017

Creativity allows you to express yourself.

This cat was inspired by the Duckworth-Robinson graphic about the benefits of creativity; see below.

Creativity allows you to express yourself.






Creativity gives you a sense of pride.

This cat was inspired by the Duckworth-Robinson graphic about the benefits of creativity; see below.

Creativity gives you a sense of pride.





Creativity can link you to others with the same passion.

This cat was inspired by the Duckworth-Robinson graphic about the benefits of creativity; see below.

Creativity can link you to others with the same passion.





12 Benefits of Creativity

A great graphic by Sylvia Duckworth as inspired by Sir Ken Robinson: creativity is a big part of how we grow!


12 Benefits of Creativity

1. Creativity is multidisciplinary.
2. Creativity allows you to express yourself.
3. Creativity promotes thinking and problem-solving.
4. Creativity reduces stress and anxiety.
5. Creativity allows you to enter your happy zone and have fun!
6. Creativity gives you a sense of purpose.
7. Creativity leads to feelings of accomplishment and pride. 
8. Creativity can link you to others with the same passion.
9. Creativity improves your ability to focus.
10. Creativity promotes risk-taking and iteration.
11. Creativity is a prerequisite for innovation. 
12. Creativity encourages us to be lifelong learners. 

Saturday, September 9, 2017

I will try again!

Today's kitten is stuck. Analyze the problem... and then try again!

What isn't working here? I will try again!



As inspired by this graphic (transcribed here):


10 Steps to Success

There's nothing fancy about this graphic's design, but the message from LikeABossGirls.com is excellent!


Transcribed:

10 Steps to Success

1. Try
2. Try again
3. Try once more
4. Try it a little differently
5. Try it again tomorrow
6. Try, and ask for help
7. Try to find someone who's done it
8. Try to determine what isn't working
9. Try to determine what is working
10. Just keep trying

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Reflect in the workflow with others.

This cat picture is inspired by the "Four Ways We Learn" infographic below.

Reflect in the workflow with others.

Four Ways We Learn

This infographic is drawn by Tanmay Vora, and inspired by the work of Charles Jennings.


WORK. Challenging experiences. "Work that stretches."
"Most of the learning is under the waterline."
Learning in the Context.

PRACTICE. Opportunities to practice. "Practice feeds high performance."

CONVERSATION. Creative conversations. Conversation is the lubrication of learning and development. "Our world is others."

REFLECTION. Time for reflection. 
Experience + Reflections = Learning that lasts.
Reflect in the workflow with others ... and away from work: individual reflection.



Monday, September 4, 2017

She believed she could, so she did.

Today's cat is inspired by a motto that a student shared in a blog post:
My life motto is, SHE BELIEVED SHE COULD, SO SHE DID, which is a quote by R.S. Grey in her book Scoring Wilder.





Saturday, September 2, 2017

I am excited by new ideas.

I am excited by new ideas.



This one is inspired by Barbara Bray's model of a "continuum of purpose" as learners grow independently, pursuing new ideas and following their passion. Here's a transcription of the graphic and more information.


Continuum of Purpose

You can read more about this infographic in Barbara Bray's inspiring article here: Continuum of Purpose: Fostering a Meaningful Life. The graphic design is by Sylvia Duckworth.


Here's a transcription:

Continuum of Purpose
Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered to Learner-driven

Conformity:
follows all the rules or directions
is measured by extrinsic factors
may not understand their purpose

Self-Awareness:
explores interests and aspirations
seeks to learn more about who they are as a person
recognizes hopes and dreams

Discovery:
is excited by new ideas
discovers their passion and what matters in life
is intrinsically motivated to investigate their passion

Making a Difference:
embraces a problem or challenge to solve
looks beyond self-interests to foster a meaningful life
has a sense of purpose in the world

Curiosity: the will to explore.


Here is the quote: “Curiosity’s most distinguishing characteristic is its open willingness to explore….” 

Curiosity: the will to explore.


The image is from cheezburger.




Thinking is part of doing.


Thinking is part of doing.




I was inspired by this graphic which I saw at Twitter:

CV86tAdWEAA44Nh.jpg:large

Friday, August 25, 2017

English. Stay creative: don't force it.

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" graphic below; here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.

Stay creative: don't force it.



This great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!






Wednesday, August 23, 2017

English: Sailing the shallows is easy, but sailing the deep has meaning.

Sailing the shallows is easy,
but sailing the deep has meaning.



I adapted this saying (I had to shorten it a bit) from this poster which my friend Stephanie Loomis made and shared at Twitter: A life lived on the shallows may be easy, but a life in the deep has meaning.


Here is the same idea, with cats from Cheezburger.

Monday, August 21, 2017

English: Creativity is the result of hard work.

The quote is adapted from Carol Dweck's book, Mindset. Here is what she says, summarizing an idea from Twyla Tharp: "Twyla Tharp [...] argues that creativity is not a magical act of inspiration. It's the result of hard work and dedication." I adapted the quote to fit the space in the cheezburger image.

Creativity is the result of hard work.




Sunday, August 20, 2017

Failure teaches you to deal with disappointment.

Today's cat is inspired by a great infographic from Sylvia Duckworth; see below.

Failure teaches you to deal with disappointment.


Here's the graphic, and here's a transcription:



10 Reasons Why Failure is Important

Here is a nice graphic from the ever-awesome Sylvia Duckworth. I'm not a big fan of the emotional side of failure (but hey, who is?). The items that appeal the most to me are identifying weaknesses (otherwise, you might not really know) and also the creativity and problem-solving skills! Failure means you need to do something differently... but what? It's a puzzle to solve!

See the transcription below.

10 Reasons Why Failure is Important


Here is the transcription:

"I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that won't work." - Thomas Editor
1. Failure means you have at least tried.
2. Every failure is a step towards success.
3. Failure makes you stronger and more resilient.
4. Failure teaches you to deal with disappointment.
5. Failure helps you to identify your weaknesses.
6. Failure inspires perseverance and builds character.
7. Failure develops creativity and problem-solving skills.
8. Failure teaches humility and empathy.
9. Failure keeps you in the growth mindset.
10. Failure helps you appreciate success.
Failure is important, but it's the moment after failure, when we get up and try again, that should be truly celebrated. Paraphrased from George Couros & Kim Pollishuke.


Saturday, July 29, 2017

English. I can do it too!

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015). Ritchie writes: "A learner has a vicarious experience when observing others accomplish tasks."

So, as others grow, you can grow also.

I can do it too!


(The image is from cheezburger.)

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

English: Look boldly ahead.

This is another one of Brad Esau's lovely photographs of Mrs. Bean. For more about Brad and Mrs. Bean, see this earlier post. You will be able to see all the Mrs. Bean posts as I add them using this link: more Mrs. Bean memes.

Each word of today's growth mindset advice is important:

LOOK: Look for yourself; don't wait for others to tell you. Use your eyes and your mind to see what's going on around you.

BOLDLY: Set aside your fears; fear is the mind killer (yes, that's from the Litany Against Fear in the great sci-fi novel Dune).

AHEAD: Don't worry about the past; look to the future instead. Growth goes forward. :-)

Look boldly ahead.




Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This”

I was excited about the references to growth mindset in the Twitter stream from #InstCon today, and here's a fantastic new infographic from Jackie Gerstein that has a lot of relevance to the growth mindset approach; read the blog post for details about each item in the infographic: Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This” — and here's the infographic, with the transcription below:



Helping Learners Move Beyond "I Can't"
  • Help learners focus on “I can’t do this . . .  YET.”
  • Teach learners strategies for dealing with frustration.
  • Encourage learners to ask for help from their peers.
  • Give learners tasks a little above their ability levels.
  • Emphasize the processes of learning rather than its product.
  • Reframe mistakes and difficulties as opportunities for learning.
  • Focus on mastery of learning; mastery of skills.
  • Avoid the urge to rescue them.
  • Provide multiple opportunities to learn and build upon previous learning.
  • May need to push learners beyond self-perceived limits.
  • Help learners accept an “it’s okay” when a task really is too hard (only as a last resort).
  • Build reflection into the learning process.


Thursday, July 20, 2017

Hard work leads to positive results.

Today's cat is inspired by Jackie Gerstein's infographic on the maker mindset / growth mindset intersection:


Hard work leads to positive results.





The Intersection of Growth Mindsets and Maker Education

Jackie Gerstein's blog is a fabulous resource for both growth mindset and maker movement ideas, and this graphic explains why the two fit so well together!

(visit the blog for the full-sized version)


Effort is valued.
Hard work leads to positive results.
Growth & development are at the forefront.
Everyone can do.
Focus is on the process of learning.
One’s personal strengths, creativity, curiosity breed results.
Challenges are seen as opportunities.
Capabilities and skills can be developed, improved, and expanded.
Failure is approached as iterative.
Feedback, positive and constructive, is openly accepted and used for growth.


Tuesday, July 18, 2017

I made a new thing!

This cat was inspired by Jackie Gerstein's "making reflection" below.

I made a new thing!




Infographic: A Making Reflection

I found this graphic at a blog post by Jackie Gerstein: The Mindset of the Maker Educator. The cycle of production and reflection that is a natural part of the making process is a great example of the growth mindset in action!


(visit the blog post for full-sized version)



  • Was I resourceful in terms of finding information, resources, and materials?
  • Did I ask other people for feedback and information, to collaborate?
  • Did I share my work and findings with others?
  • Did I learn something new?
  • Did I play and have fun?
  • Did I try to either make something better or create something new, rather than just copy something that already exists?
  • Did I approach learning as an open-ended process, open to new and all possibilities?
  • Did I accept failure as part of the process and use it to inform my learning?


Saturday, July 15, 2017

I like to try new things.

It's a "stop-and-smell-the-roses" kind of approach, but not just limited to roses! :-)


I like to try new things.





I used this infographic for today's cat; see transcript here.

Failure is an opportunity to grow.

I used this graphic in a presentation this week (slideshow and video here), so I thought it would be a good one to transcribe. As always, it's important to remember that you are not one or the other (in fact, that "either/or" thinking is a sign of a fixed attitude). Instead, the idea is that you are on a spectrum, with a growth mindset attitude being more strong in some areas of your life than others, and with different fixed mindset triggers that might bring out those limiting beliefs at any time. Learn what your fixed mindset triggers are so that you can be aware of them when they happen and think your way through them!


GROWTH MINDSET
Failure is an opportunity to grow.
I can learn to do anything I want.
Challenges help me to grow.
My effort and attitude determine my abilities.
Feedback is constructive.
I am inspired by the success of others.
I like to try new things.

FIXED MINDSET
I'm either good at it, or I'm not.
My abilities are unchanging.
I can either do it, or I can't.
I don't like to be challenged.
My potential is predetermined.
When I'm frustrated, I give up.
Feedback and criticism are personal.
I stick to what I know.

Growth Mindset for Taming the Polar Bears

I was really excited to do an online session with Brad Esau of Taming the Polar Bears this week! Below you can see the quick slideshow presentation I used for that, along with the video of Brad and me talking about growth mindset!

Slideshow:


Video:

Friday, July 7, 2017

How do I do it?

This cat is inspired by the "steps" graphic (see below).

How do I do it?
I can do it.
I will do it!




For more versions of the steps and a transcription, see this post.