Sunday, February 19, 2017

Because I feel safe, I can learn from my mistakes.

Because I feel safe, I can learn from my mistakes.




The cat was inspired by this infographic: 2. If students know the classroom is a safe place to make mistakes, they are more likely to use feedback for learning. 


1. Feedback is not advice, praise, or evaluation. Feedback is information about how we are doing in our efforts to reach a goal.
2. If students know the classroom is a safe place to make mistakes, they are more likely to use feedback for learning.
3. The feedback students give teachers can be more powerful than the feedback teachers give students.
4. When we give a grade as part of our feedback, students routinely read only as far as the grade.
5. Effective feedback occurs during the learning, while there is still time to act on it.
6. Most of the feedback that students receive about their classroom work is from other students - and much of that feedback is wrong.
7. Students need to know their learning target - the specific skill they're supposed to learn - or else "feedback" is just someone telling them what to do.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Ask me about what I'm learning!

This cat is inspired by the strategy presented in this article: The Difference Between Praise and Feedback by Anya Kamenetz.
In addition to assuring children of your continuous love and regard, “You want to understand what your child is thinking and feeling, to be respectful toward them. Asking questions is a far better idea than giving praise”—or criticism for that matter.  The idea is to support the development of a child’s autonomy by taking his perspective.

Ask me about what I'm learning!


Feedback is a relationship: you and me.

This cat is inspired by The Simple Phrase That Increases Effort 40% by Paul Sohn, where he is quoting Daniel Coyle:
I love how Coyle follows up with these insights: “The key is to understand that this feedback isn’t just feedback — it’s a vital cue about the relationship. The reason this works so well has to do with the way our brains are built. But when we receive an authentic, crystal-clear signal of social trust, belonging, and high expectations, the floodgates click open.”

Feedback is a relationship: you and me.




Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Don't echo negative thoughts inside your head.

This cat was inspired by an article about the critical voices you might hear inside your head: Silence the Critical Voices in Your Head by Sabina Nawaz.
There’s one debilitating behavior that most of us fall victim to with great regularity: listening to critical voices in our heads. Whether they originate from external criticism or our own fears and doubts, these negative voices tell us we’re not good enough, kind enough, or productive enough. Research shows that echoing negative thoughts inside our heads increases our chances of depression, isolates us from others, and inhibits us from pursuing goals.


Don't echo negative thoughts inside your head.