Monday, January 27, 2020

Do things you've never done before.

Today's cat is inspired by the words of Neil Gaiman; read more of his inspiring advice at Maria Popova's BrainPickings: Make Good Art. Neil Gaiman’s Advice on the Creative Life.

Do things you've never done before.


(The picture is from cheezburger.)



You might need to try another strategy.


You might need to try another strategy.


From Carol Dweck Says Theory of Educational Mind-Set Is Often Misunderstood by Goldie Blumenstyk (Chronicle of Higher Education). See more at the Chronicle site  (subscription required) or at the Soundcloud podcast. For more cats inspired by Carol Dweck's writings and talks, see the Dweck Collection.

Here's the context:
I heard a banking executive say, "Yeah, when I’m in a crunch. I have a deadline. Dwayne shows up." This is what Dwayne does, and how Dwayne makes me feel. This is how Dwayne effects people around me. Then the final step is talk to Dwayne. Get Dwayne on board with your growth-mind-set goals. Don’t try to get rid of Dwayne. Don’t disrespect him, but whatever you name your fixed-mind-set persona, say, "Thank you for your input." Or, "I appreciate your contribution, but why don’t we try it this way? Why don’t we take on that challenge?" There’s a setback, Dwayne comes rushing back, laughing at you. You say, "OK, that’s one way to look at it, but I think I learned something from that setback. What if we try this other strategy? Dwayne, you think you can bear with me on that?"
The image is from cheezburger.

You can learn from criticism.

This cat was inspired by From Mindset: The Psychology of Learning and Achievement by Emily Magruder.

You can learn from criticism.




Here is the specific slide that inspired this item:

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Stretch yourself and reach your goal.

For those who are making New Year's Resolutions:

Stretch yourself and reach your goal.


(The image is from cheezburger.)

I'm confident that I can go high.

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes: "People who have high levels of self-efficacy also tend to exhibit a range of positive qualities. They are more likely to choose more challenging tasks, undertake strategic thinking, work harder, exhibit resilience, and attain higher outcomes. [...] Failure is less of a deterrent, and they use resources creatively and seek possible solutions before giving up. Overall they persist longer and achieve more."

I'm confident that I can go high.