Sunday, December 18, 2016

Picture your brain forming new connections.

The quote is from Carol Dweck's Mindset: "Picture your brain forming new connections as you meet the challenge and learn."

The image is from cheezburger.

Picture your brain forming new connections.




And neutral connections are just one of the many types of connections that help learning to happen, as you can see in this great graphic from Jackie Gerstein: Learning: It’s All About the Connections.


Stay creative: be open.

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" infographic below. The image is from cheezburger. Here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.


Stay creative: be open.


This great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!




Random Growth Mindset Videos

Each time this page reloads, you'll see a video displayed at random. Each video has an accompanying blog post; click on the link below the video to learn morem about each one! To browse them all, visit the Growth Mindset Playlist at YouTube.



Student Video: Summary of Learning

One of my colleagues at the University of Oklahoma who teaches in the College of Journalism shared yesterday (via Twitter) this wonderful video by one of his students: it's a personal account that echoes many themes of the growth mindset, and the animation is absolutely gorgeous to watch. Enjoy this Summary of Learning, which she describes as follows on the YouTube page: "A brief summary of what I learned in my Copy & Layout class. & YES, I made each piece and placed them by hand. A labor of love to end the semester well!"



I really like the way that the video itself is a demonstration of the things that she is passionate about in school: clean typography and meaningful design! And she is willing to work hard at these things — very hard in fact, as this video demonstrates:





Saturday, December 17, 2016

Canvas-Friendly Growth Mindset Cats

Just this year, we've started using Canvas as the learning management system at my school (I'm blogging about the experience here). Unlike D2L, Canvas will not accept any javascripts directly, but I've come up with a work-around that makes it possible to display randomized widgets inside Canvas, and I've built a Canvas Widgets Warehouse to share those scripts with anyone who wants to use them.

Of course, you will find the Growth Mindset Cats there! That page contains links to the javascripts and also to the Canvas-friendly iframe version. Here's proof that I smuggled growth mindset cats into Canvas!


The Journey to a Growth Mindset

I was really excited to watch this new Carol Dweck video. It's pretty recent (March 2016), and she talks in details about some of the misconceptions and sloppy applications of growth mindset. If you have time to watch a full-length video, this is a really good one to choose: The Journey to a Growth Mindset.


There are also some recent articles where Carol Dweck has addressed some of these same topics:


Carol Dweck Explains The ‘False’ Growth Mindset That Worries Her

Watch out for your own fixed mindset, Carol Dweck tells teachers

The Stanford professor who pioneered praising kids for effort says we’ve totally missed the point

Carol Dweck says mindset is not ‘a tool to make children feel good’

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset

What Having a “Growth Mindset” Actually Means



Thursday, December 15, 2016

All the good stuff is outside our comfort zone.


All the good stuff is outside our comfort zone.



At Twitter, I found this Jack Canfield quote graphic: If we are not a little bit uncomfortable every day, we are not growing. All the good stuff is outside our comfort zone.


I found the image at cheezburger.



Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Empathy reduces stress.

This cat was inspired by a useful article about stress: How Harnessing the Positive Side of Stress Can Change Student Mindsets by Katrina Schwartz. Reducing stress and connecting with others are both great ways to grow your awareness and learn about the world.

Specifically, today's meme is from the first recommendation in the article:

#1 Caring for others builds resiliency against stress. To help people reset their mindsets about stress, encourage them to care for others. The biological reaction to stress naturally includes a desire to connect with others. Nurturing that inclination can dramatically reduce the harmful negative effects of stress.

The other recommendations in the article are good too: #2 Purpose in life reduces stress ... #3 Focus on how stress can help students grow. Read the article for details! Here are some more cats inspired by Katrina Schwartz's article.

Empathy reduces stress.










Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Effort is what makes you smart.

This cat believes in online learning (I do too!). The quote is from Carol Dweck's Mindset. Here are more quotes in the Carol Dweck Collection.

 Effort is what makes you smart.


Sunday, December 4, 2016

English: Success is not coming to you; you must come to it.

I've seen this quote attributed to Marva Collins, like here at Twitter this morning (which prompted me to make this meme), but I don't know if that is a correct attribution or not.  You can find out more about Collins and her great accomplishments as an educator at Wikipedia. She passed away in June of this year.


Success is not coming to you; 
you must come to it.


The image is made with cheezburger.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

English: With practice and training we can increase our attention and become more intelligent.

I was so surprised by this quote from Alfred Binet given that he is famous for inventing the IQ test. But he understood the growth mindset!

Alfred Binet, quoted by Carol Dweck in Mindset: "With practice, training, and, above all, method, we manage to increase our attention, our memory, our judgment, and literally to become more intelligent than we were before."

With practice and training, 
we can increase our attention and become more intelligent.


Monday, November 28, 2016

English. Ponder your potential.

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015). Ritchie is describing "an ideal learning situation where students consciously take responsibility for the processes of monitoring, reflecting, and eventually achieving their potential."


Ponder your potential.



(The image is from cheezburger.)

Sunday, November 27, 2016

English: Real learning takes work.

This blog post is one of several inspired by a Chris Hildrew blog post: Growth Mindset Misconceptions and Missteps.

Here are some more cats inspired by that same post!

Made with a Cheezburger cat:

Real learning takes work.


English: Sometimes, being wrong is the only way we can learn.


Sometimes, being wrong is the only way we can learn.


Today's growth cat was inspired by this wonderful blog post by Brian Koberlein, written from his perspective as a scientist: You are not stupid.


Although Brian does not mention growth mindset in particular, the labels "smart" and "stupid" are very much part of the fixed mindset, and he shows how dangerous they both are. Here are two quotes from the post:
“So what do you do for a living?” I always cringe a bit when that question comes up among strangers, because when I reveal that I’m an astrophysics professor the response is almost always the same. “Um…wow…. You must be really smart!” While it’s often intended as a compliment, it really isn’t. Smart didn’t allow me to become an astrophysicist. Hard work, dedication and the support of family and friends did. It’s also one of the most deeply divisive misconceptions about scientists that one can have: scientists are smarter than you.
One of the things I love about science is how deeply ennobling it is. Humans working together openly and honestly can do amazing things. We have developed a deep understanding of the universe around us. We didn’t gain that understanding by being stupid, but we have been wrong many times along the way. Being wrong isn’t stupid. Sometimes it’s the only way we can learn.
I was especially inspired by that last part! So, I made this image with cheezburger.



Saturday, November 26, 2016

The bigger the challenge, the more you stretch.

The quote comes from Carol Dweck's Mindset, and you can find more cats inspired by Carol Dweck here: Dweck Collection.


The bigger the challenge,
the more you stretch.


 Image made with Cheezburger.com

Friday, November 25, 2016

Study something new.

Follow your curiosity! One of my favorite aspects of growth mindset is that it encourages you to ask questions and find answers: don't just stick to what you know. Instead:

Study something new.
  


I made for this for the MemeGallery with cheezburger. I got the idea from this nifty graphic in the Farsley Farfield Primary School blog.

Sunday, November 13, 2016

English. I'm confident that I can go high.

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes: "People who have high levels of self-efficacy also tend to exhibit a range of positive qualities. They are more likely to choose more challenging tasks, undertake strategic thinking, work harder, exhibit resilience, and attain higher outcomes. [...] Failure is less of a deterrent, and they use resources creatively and seek possible solutions before giving up. Overall they persist longer and achieve more."

I'm confident that I can go high.


(The image is from cheezburger.)

Saturday, November 5, 2016

English. Commit to a goal.

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes:  "Committing to a goal is partly determined by self-efficacy, and the actions that follow are also sustained by these beleifs and lead to achievements, which are the basis for future judgments about self-efficacy."

Commit to a goal.


(The image is from cheezburger.)

Friday, November 4, 2016

English. Stay creative: have fun!

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" graphic of Islam Abudaoud below. The image is from cheezburger. Here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.

Stay creative: have fun!



This great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!




Thursday, November 3, 2016

Embrace uncertainty: facts can be fluid.

Today's cat is inspired by a great article by Linda Flanagan at MindShift: How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty. Here is a quote from the article:
And teachers have additional challenges in presenting facts as fluid: appearing less than certain about their field of expertise can feel risky in a classroom of merciless teenagers. [...] “Students have to grow comfortable not just with the idea that failure is a part of innovation, but with the idea that confusion is, too,” Holmes writes.
"Holmes" is "Jamie Holmes, who has just written a book on the hidden benefits of uncertainty." — Nonsense: The Power of Not Knowing.

Embrace uncertainty: 
facts can be fluid.


(cat image is by Rising Damp at Flickr)

Monday, October 31, 2016

Take risks and overcome obstacles.

This cat was inspired by a useful article on feedback: Overcoming The Fear Of Feedback. The cat picture is not really about feedback (that's hard to show with cats!), but the article is definitely worth reading; I've marked in bold the part that inspired the meme:
Even when receiving mostly positive feedback, it tends to be the constructive feedback that we recall most acutely. [...] When we associate abilities with a part of our identity, receiving constructive criticism can feel more like a personal attack. People with growth mindsets, on the other hand, are more likely to take risks and overcome obstacles by seeing failure as a signal to try harder, rather than time to give up. [...] When you start placing blame on others for the feedback you receive, this is your fixed mindset speaking. Once you recognize this voice you can begin counteracting it and responding with a growth mindset.

Take risks and overcome obstacles.



Made for the MemeGallery with cheezburger.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Just keep going: action overcomes fear.


Just keep going: action overcomes fear.


I was inspired by this tweet today: Reject thoughts of fear immediately. Action overcomes fear. The Secret: Keep Going. It came with this graphic:


And then I used cheezburger to make my version, paraphrasing.



Sunday, October 16, 2016

English: The future belongs to the curious.


The future belongs to the curious.


The image is from cheezburger.

Curiosity is one of the most important dimensions of the growth mindset, and this cat is inspired by a blog post by one of my favorite bloggers, Jackie Gerstein: The Future Belongs to the Curious: How Are We Bringing Curiosity Into School?








Saturday, October 15, 2016

You are capable of more than you think.

The quote is from Carol Dweck's book Mindset: "With the right mindset and the right teaching, people are capable of a lot more than we think."

You are capable
of more than you think.


Thursday, October 13, 2016

I drive my own learning ... and Canvas due dates

Today's growth cat is making her own choices about where her learning will take her... and since I invoked the metaphor of the car's emergency brake in an email I sent around to both classes this morning, I've pasted in that email below for future reference. :-)

I drive my own learning.


(made with cheezburger)

Email sent on 10/13/2016:

Hi, everybody! I don't usually do this, but there is an important item about due dates in today's announcements, so I wanted to let everyone know about that via this email: Class Announcements.

And if you mentioned something about due dates in the midterm survey, there is more information below.

CANVAS DUE DATES:

Yes, there are due dates in Canvas... and I know the due dates are not going to be convenient for everybody. That would be impossible, right? But here's the thing: you can have whatever due dates you want!

Some people said on the survey that I should make everything due on Saturday or on Sunday: great! You can totally set up the class that way. Other people said they wanted me to make everything due on Monday: that works too! Other people want Friday. And so on and so on.

That is all possible right now. You can arrange the schedule to be anything you want — ANYTHING at all. And you are the only person who knows what due dates you need.

But — here's the real challenge — you are also the only person who can enforce your due dates. I cannot do that; Canvas cannot do that. The Canvas due dates are like the emergency brake on a car; they are there in case things get a little out of control... but you don't drive a car using the emergency brake. And you are the driver of this car, not me. If you like the Canvas due dates, great! But if you don't like them, then you should change the due dates to what works better for you.

Think about it like this: for each classroom class, you have 3 hours of classroom time per week. You have to get there on time, and the clock tells you when class starts and when it stops. So, the reading and storytelling posts each week in this class are like "being in class" for 3 hours. Every week. Same time, same place. Routine. It's your schedule.

Then, think about your project plus the feedback and comments as homework, time "outside" of class. Overall, it will also average 3 hours per week, but not with a strict start and stop time. You just know more or less that the weekend is a good time to do that, or Fridays, or Thursday nights, or whatever, etc.

With an online class you have to schedule BOTH the "class time" AND the "homework time" — ALL the scheduling is up to you.

So, please, get in touch with me if you want to give yourself new due dates for the class. ANY schedule will work, and I am glad to help you set that up. Given how busy things can get at the end of the semester, now is actually the perfect time to fine-tune your schedule for this class, and I'm glad to help — just let me know!

Friday, September 30, 2016

Stay creative: take risks.

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" graphic below. Here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.

Stay creative: take risks.



The image is from cheezburger

This great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!






Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Learning requires initial experimentation.

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 4 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes: "Learning requires initial experimentation, and depending on how complicated the task is there may be layers of learning and small activities needed before the student can reproduce the modeled behavior with confidence and security."


Learning requires initial experimentation.


(The image is from cheezburger.)

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Where there is no path...

Do not go where the path may lead;
go instead where there is no path,
and leave a trail.



Although this quote is widely attributed to Emerson, that is probably not correct (see Wikiquote discussion). No matter: the words are very wise ones, no matter who said them first.

I made this for the MemeGallery with an image from Cheezburger, and here's the graphic that inspired me:




Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Stretch yourself to learn something new

Today's growth mindset cat is inspired by these words from Carol Dweck's Mindset book: "In the world of changing qualities, it's about stretching yourself to learn something new. Develop yourself."

Stretch yourself to learn something new.


The image is from Cheezburger.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Observe others: the task is possible!

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes: "Vicarious learning can be effective when introducing completely new material or when rebuilding students are less than successful experiences. [...] Watching others can communicate a sense that the task is possible."

Observe others: the task is possible!



(The image is from cheezburger.)

Sunday, September 18, 2016

I plan; I design; I create.

The quote comes from a review in BrainPickings of Janna Malamud Smith, An Absorbing Errand: How Artists and Craftsmen Make Their Way to Mastery.

As with the literal act of gardening, pursuing any practice seriously is a generative, hardy way to live in the world. You are in charge (as much as we can ever pretend to be — sometimes like a sea captain hugging the rail in a hurricane); you plan; you design; you labor; you struggle. And your reward is that in some seasons you create a gratifying bounty.


I plan; I design; I create.


(cheezburger; I'm pretty sure the cat in the picture
is the international cat celebrity Nyalan)

Friday, September 16, 2016

Stay creative: get lots of rest.

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" graphic below. Here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.


Stay creative: get lots of rest.


The cat image is from cheezburger, and this great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!






Thursday, September 15, 2016

The hand you're dealt is just the starting point.

Today's cat was inspired by this quote from Carol Dweck's book Mindset: "In this [growth] mindset, the hand you're dealt is just the starting point for development. This growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts."

The hand you're dealt is just the starting point.


The image is from cheezburger.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Stop for a moment and just think.

At Pinterest, I found a link to this nifty poster: I Don't Know What to Do Next, and it inspired this cat:



The image is from cheezburger — and here is more from that same poster:


Don't know what to do next?
Dig deep and stick with it.
Look in a book or use the Internet.
Can you find an example?
Keep calm and read it again.
Remind yourself not knowing is okay. 
Work together and ask a friend.
Pause a moment and just think.
Still not sure? Then ask your teacher.

So, that inspired me to make this cat; the image is from cheezburger.



Monday, September 12, 2016

In order to learn, we must probe and poke.


In order to learn,
we must probe and poke.


Today's cat is inspired by a great article by Linda Flanagan at MindShift: How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty. Here's a specific quote from the article (the whole thing is very much worth reading!):
There’s already a believer of the uncertain in science — Columbia neuroscience professor Stuart Firestein, who argues that “insightful ignorancedrives science. [...] Firestein describes scientific discovery as “groping and probing and poking, and some bumbling and bungling, and then a switch is discovered, often by accident, and the light is lit.” All the poking around in the unknown, he adds, is what makes science exhilarating.

The image is from cheezburger.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

I learn new things constantly.

Today's cat is inspired by an item in the infographic you will find below:

I learn new things constantly.



Here is the infographic by "Jan and Alicia" that I've seen making the rounds on Twitter: