Padlet

Friday, September 30, 2016

Stay creative: take risks.

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" graphic below. Here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.

Stay creative: take risks.



The image is from cheezburger

This great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!






Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Learning requires initial experimentation.

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 4 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes: "Learning requires initial experimentation, and depending on how complicated the task is there may be layers of learning and small activities needed before the student can reproduce the modeled behavior with confidence and security."


Learning requires initial experimentation.


(The image is from cheezburger.)

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Where there is no path...

Do not go where the path may lead;
go instead where there is no path,
and leave a trail.



Although this quote is widely attributed to Emerson, that is probably not correct (see Wikiquote discussion). No matter: the words are very wise ones, no matter who said them first.

I made this for the MemeGallery with an image from Cheezburger, and here's the graphic that inspired me:




Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Stretch yourself to learn something new

Today's growth mindset cat is inspired by these words from Carol Dweck's Mindset book: "In the world of changing qualities, it's about stretching yourself to learn something new. Develop yourself."

Stretch yourself to learn something new.


The image is from Cheezburger.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Observe others: the task is possible!

This quote is inspired by a passage from Chapter 2 of Laura Ritchie's book, Fostering Self-Efficacy in Higher Education Students (2015).

Ritchie writes: "Vicarious learning can be effective when introducing completely new material or when rebuilding students are less than successful experiences. [...] Watching others can communicate a sense that the task is possible."

Observe others: the task is possible!



(The image is from cheezburger.)

Sunday, September 18, 2016

I plan; I design; I create.

The quote comes from a review in BrainPickings of Janna Malamud Smith, An Absorbing Errand: How Artists and Craftsmen Make Their Way to Mastery.

As with the literal act of gardening, pursuing any practice seriously is a generative, hardy way to live in the world. You are in charge (as much as we can ever pretend to be — sometimes like a sea captain hugging the rail in a hurricane); you plan; you design; you labor; you struggle. And your reward is that in some seasons you create a gratifying bounty.


I plan; I design; I create.


(cheezburger; I'm pretty sure the cat in the picture
is the international cat celebrity Nyalan)

Friday, September 16, 2016

Stay creative: get lots of rest.

Today's cat was inspired by the "Stay Creative" graphic below. Here are some more Stay-Creative Cats.


Stay creative: get lots of rest.


The cat image is from cheezburger, and this great graphic is designed by Islam Abudaoud. You can see the full-size infographic here, and it's also been made into a Vimeo video!






Thursday, September 15, 2016

The hand you're dealt is just the starting point.

Today's cat was inspired by this quote from Carol Dweck's book Mindset: "In this [growth] mindset, the hand you're dealt is just the starting point for development. This growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts."

The hand you're dealt is just the starting point.


The image is from cheezburger.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Stop for a moment and just think.

At Pinterest, I found a link to this nifty poster: I Don't Know What to Do Next, and it inspired this cat:



The image is from cheezburger — and here is more from that same poster:


Don't know what to do next?
Dig deep and stick with it.
Look in a book or use the Internet.
Can you find an example?
Keep calm and read it again.
Remind yourself not knowing is okay. 
Work together and ask a friend.
Pause a moment and just think.
Still not sure? Then ask your teacher.

So, that inspired me to make this cat; the image is from cheezburger.



Monday, September 12, 2016

In order to learn, we must probe and poke.


In order to learn,
we must probe and poke.


Today's cat is inspired by a great article by Linda Flanagan at MindShift: How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty. Here's a specific quote from the article (the whole thing is very much worth reading!):
There’s already a believer of the uncertain in science — Columbia neuroscience professor Stuart Firestein, who argues that “insightful ignorancedrives science. [...] Firestein describes scientific discovery as “groping and probing and poking, and some bumbling and bungling, and then a switch is discovered, often by accident, and the light is lit.” All the poking around in the unknown, he adds, is what makes science exhilarating.

The image is from cheezburger.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

I learn new things constantly.

Today's cat is inspired by an item in the infographic you will find below:

I learn new things constantly.



Here is the infographic by "Jan and Alicia" that I've seen making the rounds on Twitter:


Friday, September 9, 2016

Open your mind with a new perspective.


The three biases are: confirmation bias, conservatism bias, and conformity bias, with solutions for each one as follows:
  • Solution: Purposefully open your mind. Objectively considering “the other side of the story” does not mean you have to accept it. But at least you have a shot at growth.
  • Solution: As with goals, sometimes we need to quickly adapt in the face of new and contrary indications. Take the time to verify, but then make a move.
  • Solution: Have the courage to act according to your own convictions.
As you can see, I was inspired by the confirmation bias solution to create today's cat, using this upside-down cat from cheezburger.

Open your mind with a new perspective.




Wednesday, September 7, 2016

The emotions of learning: surprise, awe, interest, and confusion.

Today's cat is inspired by a great article by Linda Flanagan at MindShift: How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty. Here is a quote from the article; "Holmes" is "Jamie Holmes, who has just written a book on the hidden benefits of uncertainty." — Nonsense: The Power of Not Knowing.
The emotions of learning are surprise, awe, interest and confusion,” Holmes said. But because confusion provokes discomfort, it should be discussed by teachers to help students handle the inevitable disquiet. “Students have to grow comfortable not just with the idea that failure is a part of innovation, but with the idea that confusion is, too,” Holmes writes. Teachers can help students cope with these feelings by acknowledging their emotional response and encouraging them to view ambiguity as a learning opportunity.

The emotions of learning:
surprise, awe, interest, and confusion.




Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Explore ambiguity.

Today's cat is inspired by a great article by Linda Flanagan at MindShift: How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty. Here is a quote from the article; "Holmes" is "Jamie Holmes, who has just written a book on the hidden benefits of uncertainty." — Nonsense: The Power of Not Knowing.
“We’re much more certain about facts than we should be,” Holmes said. “A lot of this will be challenged, and it should not be embarrassing.”

If students can be made to feel comfortable with uncertainty — if they’re learning in an environment where ambiguity is welcome and they are encouraged to question facts — then they are more apt to be curious and innovative in their thinking.

“Our minds crave closure, but when we latch onto it prematurely we miss beautiful and important moments along the way,” Holmes said, including the opportunity to explore new ideas or consider novel interpretations.
Explore ambiguity.


(cat image is by Henri at Flickr)